The Three Sisters

October 31, 2023  •  1 Comment

 

The lore of the Three Sisters, woven into the cultural tapestry of Native America, has been bequeathed through an ancient lineage of oral tradition. These sisters—gifts of the Great Spirit—symbolize a symbiotic triad fostering sustenance, equilibrium, and a sacred concord with the cosmos and the Creator.

 

Corn, the venerable matriarch of this triad, known as maize, boasts a cultivation saga stretching beyond millennia. Emblematic of vitality, its soaring stems provide a lattice for its kin, the beans, to ascend. Beans, in turn, impart the earth with life-sustaining nitrogen, a testament to the equilibrium of the natural realm and the age-old agricultural acumen of the indigenous populace. Squash, the third consort, swathes the terra firma with its verdant drapery, functioning as an organic mulch that conserves the earth’s vigor, all the while thwarting the encroachment of weeds and the advances of predators.

 

The cultivation mosaic of the Three Sisters stands as a paragon of ecological husbandry, mitigating soil exhaustion, curtailing the dependence on artificial enhancers, and preserving the aqueous treasures of Mother Earth. These staples form a robust nutritional consortium: maize for carbohydrates, beans for protein, and squash for a plethora of vitamins and minerals—fuelling indigenous societies through the ages.

 

Beyond their role as nourishment, the Three Sisters embody the spiritual and communal nexus of Native American ethos. The communal rituals of planting and reaping, the shared bounty—these are the sinews of tribal solidarity.

 

 

As the esteemed Tadodaho Leon Shenandoah imparted, our existence is intertwined with the land which has engendered us—we are not its proprietors. In honoring the Three Sisters' rich cultural legacy, may we also embrace the sage principles of indigenous cultures and their indispensable insights into sustainable existence and agrarian prudence.

 

See the Three Lumbee Sisters of Prospect: Merelene Locklear, Carol Hunt, and Flora Scott, standing sentinel under the 'Land of Lumbee' ensign adjacent to the Lumber River. This landmark, christened by a landholder, commemorates the storied refuge of the legendary Henry Berry Lowry, the indigenous counterpart to Robin Hood.

 


 

 

These Lumbee guardians, with open hearts, permitted the capture of their likenesses for the International Agency for Indigenous Agency's noble cause. This body endeavors to cast a light upon those they champion: the indigenous, such as these Sisters.

The International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2), an altruistic entity, dedicates itself to the upliftment of health and wellness of Native elders across realms. Their mission is to guide understanding in service to Native communities, promoting savvy engagement from the grassroots to the national tableau. At its core, IA2 honors the profound histories, sovereignties, and cultures of indigenous peoples, from the dawn of life to twilight years, and fosters authentic alliances with these sovereign nations.

 

In gratitude, we acknowledge the Three Lumbee Sisters and their kin for illuminating the magnificence of indigenous fellowship to the global audience.

 

 


Comments

Genia Hunt(non-registered)
My beautiful aunts. I am so grateful that they have taught us to work hard, love our family and others but most of all to Serve the Lord. Proud of where I came from
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